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. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
for politics. in >>> authorities in cairo are bracing for more protests as outrage grows as morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. nbc's ayman moyheldin joins us with the latest. ayman, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. authorities are bracing for what could be the fifth day of violent clashes erupting between those who oppose president morsi and those who support him. now, over the past several days, we've seen some intense clashes. many of those protesters targeting the offices of the freedom and justice party, the organization that president mohamed morsi is politically affiliated with. now, the anger stems from the decree that president morsi issued. that degree gave him the ability to legislate powers without any type of judicial review. the president says you have to take those measures because egypt's judiciary is full of remnants of the old regime and pro-mubarak-appointed judges. that's why according to him there's a slow transition to democracy. the other opponents of this decree are saying that president morsi is doing nothing than simply grabbing mor
, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. >> so there you have it. what do you think about that, and what role does that statement by her make in the concern about her qualifications? >> yeah. you know, chris, one of the things that's amplified some of the concerns around this is we had a classified briefing with about 65 or 70 senators on september the 20th, and i assure you if you were there, you would have thought it was one of the most bizarre briefings ever where we had four, you know, distinguished people there who shared like no information. i was in libya about a week after that. it was a preplanned trip. i didn't go there because of benghazi. obviously benghazi was a big topic, and i sat there with our station chief, our head intelligence person who was there serving after the ambassador had bee
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
days of clashes and sending the country's stock market into a freefall. our reporter is in cairo with the very latest. ayman, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. egypt's stock market opened for a second straight day, and it plunged already by 4%. now, that's already a day after it lost 10%, and officials there had to stop trading just to prevent it from declining any further. that's the economic turmoil this country finds itself in. there are tons of other political and social unrest unfolding across the egyptian capital, cairo. a short while from now, mourners are going to be praying for one of the victims, and they'll be burying him as well as another one that died in clashes overnight. as a result, egypt's president says he's going to hold meetings today with some of the country's top officials, including the judges who, over the past few days, have called for nationwide strikes. right now they and several other important unions including journalists and revolutionary group movements have been angered by the president's decision to assume more power including legislative
to his world view, whether it's in the middle east, the cairo speech, about china, russia, things like that. this was another one, i think, in that line of speeches, people really want ed to understand th obama doctrine if they read all of these speeches together almost in a little book form they would get a better understanding of the president's world view. i would assume a lot of people already believe they have that understanding. he's off to cambodia and then it's back home because he has to pardon that turkey. i'll see you soon. >> thanks, chuck. even across the world in asia, the president can't escape washington. at a buddhist monastery he joked that geshgs 0s on the fiscal cliff may require a little help in the almighty. >> yes, we're working on this budget. we're going to need a lot of prayer. >> also on the president's plate a developing fight over who removed language and talking points given to susan rights that suggested al qaeda may have been behind the terrorist attack in libya? >> it went to the so-called deputy's committee that's populated by appointees from the admin
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
to address the nation. before that atresz, more violence today in the streets of cairo. protesters demanding president morsi rescind his decree once again clashing with police. there are calms for giant protests coming up for tomorrow as well as saturday. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel joins us live from cairo with more on this. president morsi, richard, is expected to address the nation at the top of the hour. do we have any information about what he's going to say basically trying to calm the crowds that are expected to protest? >> reporter: yeah. i think what he's going to say, however, is not going to calm these crowds. it is only going to make them more angry. he's probably going to set a date for a referendum on the constitution. as you said, a week ago today, president morsi gave himself extraordinary powers. he made himself more powerful than any previous egyptian presidents. more powerful than the kings of egypt, in fact. he said that his word was law. that in decree that he issued could not be overturned by the supreme court, by any court in this land. his word
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel a
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
but they will he can press a complaint with cairo, the government that sponsored this truce and they will record their complaint that a violation has happened. alex? >> has this done anything to quell all the celebrations that were going on there in gaza? >> reporter: well, there were celebrations all throughout the day on thursday. yesterday hamas declared it a victory. the palestinian factions held military parade. there weren't many rallies expected today though it is friday prayers here. a lot of mosques throughout the territory did celebrate the victory that occurred as a result of the eight days of fighting. but right now there are no celebrations taking place or rallies though the mood here is relatively calm. people are going about their business as usual despite this violation. alex? >> all right, ayman, many thanks from that. to gaza to israel and tel aviv. special correspondent martin fletcher is joining us. martin, with a good friday to you. let's talk about what israeli forces have done having announced they've made several arrests in wednesday's bus bombing there in tel aviv. what'
is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast-track a new constitution being wr
of vermont. we are keeping our eyes on the breaking news coming to us out of cairo. i want to show you live pictures of protesters back in tahrir square today for another day of demonstrations over the egyptian president's effort to assert new powers. the protesters reminiscent of the uprising that took down hosni mubarak two years ago, and we've heard a third protester has died as a result of these protests. n. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. citi price rewind. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget dea
will be flying to cairo where she will meet egypt's president. many hoped a truce would go into effect last night. it did not. gaza felt like a war zone throughout the evening. a lot is riding on the secretary's visit. >> ayman mohyeldin, thank you very much. >>> we want to go to the mayor of jerusalem. he joins us live from jerusalem over the phone. we want to thank you for the time joining us. we just mentioned the secretary of stated spending there with prime minister netanyahu in jerusalem yet, working to broker some kind of a deal, a cease-fire. how confident are you that this can even happen? >> it's very clear that it's short-term since the leadership of the hamas believes, like osama bin laden and al qaeda in death and destruction and their charter is to destroy israel. it's difficult to broker a deal with somebody that wants to kill you and they're not changing their charter. the challenge here is how do we make sure the hamas leadership understands that their motivation should be zero, very negative motivation to try and shoot indiscriminate fire on israeli civilians. >> so how far are
washington and cairo and, of course, jerusalem, too. a lot of pressure is coming from america but at the same time, america has said to israel before this all started, almost gave them the green light really saying america agreed that israel needs to do what it needs to do to defend itself so that was giving israel the permission to respond to what after all was a hundred palestinian rockets fired into israel in five days before israel retaliated. >> all right. nbc's martin fletcher. we appreciate the report and obviously stay safe for us over there. >>> also this morning, general petraeus, retired david petraeus red heading to capitol hill where he'll testify. he is expected to focus on the time line of exactly when the agency knew the attack on the american consulate was an act of terrorism and not a protest gone wrong as first suggested. in a close session yesterday members of the house and senate intelligence committee saw for the first time surveillance video and drone recordings of the attack as it unfolded. public hearing on benghazi apparently are in the works general petraeus still d
weary. bring the troops home. >> it's too long. >>> mass protests are planned on the streets of cairo tomorrow after egypt's president, mohamed morsi, granted himself sweeping power over the country's judicial system. that sparked days of violent demonstrations and shook egypt's stock market which dropped nearly 10%. members of morsi's own government questioned the presidential decree, and several officials resigned because of it. but the administration says the move is necessary to keep supporters of former president hosni maubarak from blocking democratic reforms. morsi is expected to meet with senior judges today in an effort to stave off a wider crisis. >> this comes from a man who originally said they were never going to be involved in the government in the first place. >>> in syria where rebels say they've taken control of a key base near the capital of damascus. government forces, meanwhile, continue to target opposition forces with airstrikes. at least eight children were killed when one of those bombing runs had it tore through a village. rebel fighters are largely focusing t
not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us. steve, what's it looking like over there? >> it's looking pretty good. i haven't even started my holiday season shopping. i'll leave that right till the last moment. what is really fascinating is every single surve
. >> we know they are ongoing. israeli radio is saying an envoy was sent to cairo today. that person will meet up with envoys from the palestinian side, as well as representatives from qatar and egypt that will work on negotiating a cease fire. today you had prime minister netanyahu say as long as the rockets are landing in israel there will be no cease fire. his defense minister ehud barak said he expects the possibility of this conflict widening. that's a suggestion there could be some ground invasion in gaza at the very least. as you know, there are troops amassing in in the south of israel preparing for that ground invasion. although so far it seems like talks are ongoing ander in a period of trying to figure out if they can maintain a cease fire so the troops don't have to go in. >> it is a tense time is an under statement there. how long will these talks go underway? do you know? is there an outside that israel has indicated they will allow for them to try to negotiate and bargain before they may do military action? >> well, we did hear from the foreign minister in israel who s
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense of euphoria. there's going to be hangover when the dust settles when they bury the dead and count the costs, there ought to be as there was after cass led in 2008-2009, a clear contrast with a much better situ
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
reaction to what had just al transpired hours before in cairo. >> this was not a demonstration. this was an attack by terrorists. >> so i've got mr. obama sitting here. and he's -- i just was going to ask him a couple of questions. >> no president, not me, not any of my predecessors, no one could have fully repaired all of the damage that he found in just four years. >> the 47% who are with him, believe that they are victims. >> when he said behind closed doors that 47% of the country considered themselves victims who refuse personal responsibility, think about who he was talking about. >> so there it is. we're two days left. mayor, what stands out for you? >> well, the clinton speech, when he basically put it plain and used simple arithmetic. this was a damaged economy, and now this was a president who faced challenges that haven't been seen since the great depression. the second part, the part where i got fired up, because i'm not $9 tax cuts for -- tax cuts 10 to one? and all of them said no. that's why obama's a better choice, he has a balanced approach. >> and bill clinton
that suggest that the video was the genesis of it. i know what was happening in cairo, they were concerned about that. but what is crystal clear is that immediately, they knew because they said they testified in the hearing we had before the election, that there they were witnessing this in real time and all of those indications were that this was a very orchestrated, very sophisticated attack on the compound that went on for hours and hours and hours. this was not a mob gone wild. there was not a video sparking this spontaneously. >> congressman, you've had your own hearings with darrell issa and there have been complaints from the democratic ranking members that they were not involved in either the witness lists or the briefings by the witnesses or questioning leading into it. what do you think of senator mccain and senator graham who are calling for a select committee which would be perhaps a joint committee, house and senate, bipartisan, to have one group like a watergate panel or an iran-contra panel to look into benghazi? >> the first part of your question i would beg to differ. the
by the protests at the u.s. embassy in cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the u.s. post in benghazi and subsequently its annex. the last thing is the investigation is ongoing and the u.s. government is working with the libyan authorities to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths of u.s. citizens. that's reality. >> conspiracy, conspiracy, conspiracy. >> the president's most passionate moment of the week is his moment when he was defending susan rice in the press conference. he seemed like i'm standing up to a bully. he stepped out of that professorial aloof poos tour we sometimes think he's in. he seemed very animated. >> he was exactly the same in that presidential debate when he is accused of not labeling this a terrorist attack and he was fuming again in front of mitt romney. >> you want a problem come to me because i'm the problem, not the u.n. ambassador. but by the way, john mccain who wants to challenge susan rice's probity in these sort of things, where was he when they did the classified hearing about benghazi yesterday? he couldn't make it because he had a previ
bibi says to her about what israel's goals are and again when she goes to cairo and meets with president morsi which is arguably the most important stop on this trip. >> because he's the mediator. >> and president obama has developed a very interesting relationship over the past -- >> i think we have to hold onto morsi. >> with the president of egypt. >> don't you? >> absolutely. >> how important -- >> let's be clear -- >> always had the deal between israel and egypt in the interest of both countries and our country. can we keep that deal? there are some architecture for peace there? >> we're going to try to keep that deal absolutely, but, remember, we're complicit in part of what happened. obama when he took george michel's resignation and basically moved dennis ross out of the white house, he doesn't put a new program on the table. and when america walks away from this peace process or an effort to bring the two sides together and really lay out a plan, violence kicks up. so we have a bit of complicity and you you are seeing right now not a strategic presidency from obam
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
everywhere. >>> giving you a look at these new protests happening right now in cairo's tahrir square. supporters and opponents of egypt's new president, mohamed morsi, are staging raval rallies after he assumed new powers this week including putting himself above judicialry. president morsi is speaking at the presidential palace saying egypt needs to stay unified. >>> also, some new video to share this hour. walmart workers protesting in it landover, maryland. hundreds of employees have planned protests over low wages and benefits. >>> well, this was the scene in los angeles wednesday night. you are about to see these miles and miles upon traffic literally stuck on the 405 freeway, a very ugly start to the holiday travel season. look at all those red and white christmas colors. no, not so much. and whether you are about to head back home after traveling for the holiday or stayed at home, chances are you still have some travel slated before the year's end and if you don't there might be reason to get away. so joining me now is brian kelly founder of the pointsguide.com. brian, i'm gla
in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good new
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
. 180 metro areas have jobless rates below 7%. outside the u.s. protesters jammed cairo protesting a decree by president morsi. now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." u.s. congressman tom cole of oklahoma signaled republicans should accept president obama's tax offer. earlier today the president made note of it. let's listen. >> i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> congressman, thank you for joining us tonight. give us your thinking about why it's important, i know politically it makes sense to many people, middle class, people making up to $250,000 a year, get the tax cut continued but people above are basically decoupled from that much larger group of people. >> well, chris, i don't think taxes ought to go up for anybody. i think it's bad economic policy. it will eventually cost us jobs and eventually slow the e
needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted
in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tragedy. that means hamas might be able to spin this into a long term political benefit for themselves. >> the counter argument to what i made is would you rather live in gaza or the west bank. >> it's still the west bank, bu
to cairo in april. >> amazing interview. everyone should read this interview. >> thank you, chris. was able to interview abu march zuk which was extraordinary. we have to say that on the one hand fact that he sat down with the editor of a jewish newspaper was amazing. however, his position didn't change. >> you know what, i'm sorry, we need to understand now that netanyahu has been in government for seven years and before him and arab countries met two, three times. in 2006, they told israel we're ready to recognize you. the only condition, please withdraw from the west bank, from the occupied territories. we're all ready, all of us together. the broker of that deal was actually king abdullah from the saudi. they went on and they told ariel sharon before and the israeli response, no thank you, we don't want this. we want the status quo. netanyahu himself carried the status quo building settlements. i'm surprised to hear that jewish americans want a two-state solution. it's not -- it's not 22%. we're not giving them anything. that will lead to empowering more and more hamas. hamas is the win
down with egypt's president in cairo. we'll be following that as well. >>> all right. coming up on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog adviso
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